Community service – Sanshin Zen Community http://sanshinzencommunity.org/ Tue, 17 May 2022 11:36:26 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://sanshinzencommunity.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-150x150.png Community service – Sanshin Zen Community http://sanshinzencommunity.org/ 32 32 HCHR Support Supervisor – Axios Charlotte https://sanshinzencommunity.org/hchr-support-supervisor-axios-charlotte/ Tue, 17 May 2022 11:36:26 +0000 https://sanshinzencommunity.org/hchr-support-supervisor-axios-charlotte/ What are the requirements to be successful in this position:Lead Habitats critical home repair support team to achieve program goals in an efficient and timely manner. Provide counseling and support to family partners participating in Habitat Charlotte Regions Critical Home Repair Program (HCHR) for the entire service area (Iredell and Mecklenburg counties) [except Matthews]). Working […]]]>

What are the requirements to be successful in this position:
Lead Habitats critical home repair support team to achieve program goals in an efficient and timely manner. Provide counseling and support to family partners participating in Habitat Charlotte Regions Critical Home Repair Program (HCHR) for the entire service area (Iredell and Mecklenburg counties) [except Matthews]). Working in conjunction with other members of the Family Services, Building and Development departments, this individual will provide leadership and oversight of the Essential Home Repairs program, working to fulfill Habitat Charlotte Regions’ mission: Seeking to put God’s love into action, Habitat for Humanity brings people together to build homes, communities and hope.

Essential functions:
• In coordination with CHRDFS, assist in revising HCHR program policies and procedures in:
• An annual policy review
• monitoring of community service hours, act restrictions and reimbursement structure
• Provide direct supervision to HCHR Support Coordinators and AmeriCorps National Members
• Provide oversight of grant compliance by ensuring receipt of required documentation and forms, communicating with other relevant parties, completing necessary reports and participating in audits as required
• Assist CHRDFS in completing required periodic reports, striving to provide accurate and relevant program information to inform program growth
• Oversee and coordinate recognition opportunities for family/volunteer/staff partners involved in projects and celebration of partnerships with Habitat, in particular by coordinating the annual family reunion event
• Work closely with the CHRDFS, HCHR Construction and Grants team to establish impact measurement and analysis processes to determine the impact of program components and changes as they occur. produce
• Participate in HCHR strategy meetings with HCHR Family Services, HCHR Construction and Grants team to measure pipeline progress, develop/amend procedures and communicate program changes
• Provide guidance to HCHR support staff in coordinating family partner participation efforts in the HCHR program, which include, but are not limited to: monthly aging together workshops and community service opportunities
Provide case management to HCHR family partners throughout the HCHR program by
• Set program expectations
• Answer questions relevant to the program and their project as much as possible
• Defend the interests of family partners as needed
• Prepare and execute required program documents in a timely manner, in coordination with HCHR construction staff, grants and family partners

Knowledge, skills and requirements:
• 2 years of experience in supervision or as a project manager preferred
• 2 years of experience in social services or housing
• College degree preferred
• Experience working with diverse populations
• Intermediate level experience with Microsoft Office suite (Word, Excel, PowerPoint)
• Experience with grant compliance
• Strong written and verbal communication skills
• Ability to work independently as well as in a team environment
• Ability to manage multiple priorities
• Exceptional organizational skills, dedication to timely project completion and strong attention to detail
• Comfortable working in a fast-paced environment
• Program development skills
• Commitment to the principles and core values ​​of Habitat Charlotte Region
• Preferred NC notary
• Valid driver’s license
• Personal vehicle that can be used occasionally for professional purposes

Physical requirements:
Ability to sit at a desk and use a computer for extended periods. Ability to lift/pull up to 20 lbs. Ability to visit home repair sites, including homes that may have stairs.

Internal interactions:
All Habitat staff, AmeriCorps members

External interactions:
Community Partners, Volunteers, Habitat Family Partners, Habitat for Humanity International and Affiliates

Program:
Tuesday to Saturday 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. (occasional evening and weekend hours required)

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Windcrest miners who violate curfew may face community service https://sanshinzencommunity.org/windcrest-miners-who-violate-curfew-may-face-community-service/ Sun, 15 May 2022 09:13:10 +0000 https://sanshinzencommunity.org/windcrest-miners-who-violate-curfew-may-face-community-service/ Instead of paying a fine, children caught wandering Windcrest at night may soon be required to attend a tutoring program or do community service. The city council agreed to move forward with an ordinance reinstating a youth curfew with several amendments at the first meeting in May. Specifically for people under the age of 17, […]]]>

Instead of paying a fine, children caught wandering Windcrest at night may soon be required to attend a tutoring program or do community service.

The city council agreed to move forward with an ordinance reinstating a youth curfew with several amendments at the first meeting in May.

Specifically for people under the age of 17, the curfew allows Windcrest Police Department peace officers to arrest, question and request the identification of minors in public between 9 a.m. and 2:30 p.m. Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, and Fridays while school is in session and between midnight and 6 a.m. every weekday. It is due to expire on Monday.

The ordinance amends the curfew by changing the focus of penalties for violators from “monetary punishment to proactive community-based correction” and pardoning parents of violators.

Specifically, offenders will no longer be considered a Class C misdemeanor and parents of offenders will no longer be subject to penalties even if they knowingly allowed their children to commit the offense, the text says.

According to the Texas Penal Code, Class C misdemeanors “shall be punished with a fine not to exceed $500.” However, offenders will instead be required to complete a predetermined number of hours of community service under the order.

This community service may include participation in a tutoring program, a mentoring program, an alcohol or drug addiction program, or a preparatory class for the proposed Texas high school equivalency exam. by a government entity, nonprofit organization, or educational institution.

Windcrest first adopted a youth curfew in 1994.

Mayor Dan Reese said data negatively correlating the city’s curfew and crime rates has gone “back and forth.” However, Pro Tem Mayor Joan Pedrotti felt the curfew had a purpose.

“If you go out after midnight and you’re 17, 16 or 14, that gives the police the opportunity to stop and say, ‘What are you doing? ‘” Pedrotti said. “It’s an effective tool, and it serves a purpose.”

“Nothing good happens after midnight, especially if you’re underage,” she added.

In addition to Pedrotti, many council members were in favor of the ordinance. They alluded to previous incidents involving minors congregating or partying after hours.

‘I can’t think of any legitimate reason…for a 14-year-old, or a group of 14-year-olds, (to) be walking the streets of Windcrest at two in the morning,’ Councilman Wes Manning said. .

Some council members offered to push back, noting that the order assumed the worst.

Referring to a citizen’s statement made earlier at the council meeting, Councilman Greg Turner said: ‘When we talk about no kids going to check Pawpaw’s computer (at 2 a.m. morning), it is debatable. It just depends.

The ordinance was passed after about 45 minutes of heated discussions between Reese and the council. However, Pedrotti noted that board approval only means the order will be discussed at a public hearing.

“All we’re doing now is saying, ‘Yeah, we want to go ahead and hear what the public has to say about it,'” Pedrotti said.

Reese said the curfew appears to have broad approval among Windcrest residents.

“I didn’t see any citizen who objected to it,” he said. “My feeling is that people see it as a tool that the police can use to make sure everything is fine between midnight and 6 a.m.”

The hearing is scheduled for Monday, the same day the current curfew expires.

At the end of the hearing, the ordinance will again be submitted to the vote of the council. If approved at that time, it will come into effect immediately.

caroline.tien@hearst.com

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Program gives people $30 a month for internet, but less than a third of eligible Coloradans take part https://sanshinzencommunity.org/program-gives-people-30-a-month-for-internet-but-less-than-a-third-of-eligible-coloradans-take-part/ Fri, 13 May 2022 10:43:00 +0000 https://sanshinzencommunity.org/program-gives-people-30-a-month-for-internet-but-less-than-a-third-of-eligible-coloradans-take-part/ A federal program offering $30 to $75 a month to offset the cost of high-speed internet service has attracted less than 30% of eligible users in Colorado since its launch in January. But that fraction includes 132,060 Colorado households that have signed up for the Affordable Connectivity Program, as of May 9. The program, which […]]]>

A federal program offering $30 to $75 a month to offset the cost of high-speed internet service has attracted less than 30% of eligible users in Colorado since its launch in January.

But that fraction includes 132,060 Colorado households that have signed up for the Affordable Connectivity Program, as of May 9. The program, which began last year to help low-income families pay for internet access, is available to those eligible for government assistance programs, such as food stamps, free school meals or discounted and Medicaid. There are approximately 1.4 million Coloradans on Medicaid.

The $14 billion program, funded by the trillion-dollar infrastructure bill passed by Congress last year, replaced the Emergency Broadband Benefit, which provided $50 a month to low-income families. EBB ended Dec. 31 and ACP took over as a permanent replacement, offering $30 to most participants and $75 to those living on tribal land. Discounts on devices were part of both programs.

“The bipartisan infrastructure bill is a big win for Colorado, especially because it will connect every home to high-speed internet. But a connection is useless if you can’t afford the service,” Senator John Hickenlooper said in an email. “We are working to spread the word and urge all Coloradians who think they might be qualified to go to GetInternet.gov.”

A marketing campaign started this week to help spread the word. President Joe Biden held a press conference on Monday to announce that 20 internet companies covering 80% of America have agreed to provide 100 megabit service for less than $30 in order for the grant to make internet service free.

Comcast, one of Colorado’s largest internet service providers, was among the companies that cut costs. Much of its plan for low-income people targets urban areas where the digital divide is a result of cost, not service availability. The Essential Internet plan — which is now at 50 megabits per second but has held steady at $9.95 for years — has added a “Plus” tier, offering 100 Mbps for $29.99.

“If you apply ACP credit, then it’s free,” said Leslie Oliver, a Comcast spokeswoman. “From our perspective, this addresses some of the affordability issues that are why people aren’t logging on.”

Comcast has extended its $9.95 Internet service for low-income households to add faster service for triple the price. But the new Internet Essentials Plus, at $29.99, is free for eligible customers approved for the federal Affordable Connectivity Program, which provides $30 a month to pay for Internet service. (Handout)

Dozens of community Internet service providers in Colorado participate in the ACP and many have their own subsidized programs. Fort Collins Connexion, a city-operated internet service that launched the service in 2019, created a digital equity program in 2020. Low-income residents can get gigabit internet access for $19.95, Erin said. Shanley, Connexion’s Head of Broadband Marketing.

“I was actually just pointing out to my editor today that Comcast, Verizon and a few others are like, ‘We’ll give you 100 megabits for $30,'” Shanley said. “We’re giving away 1,000 megabits for $20.”

With ACP, Connexion’s digital equity service is free. Connexion also pre-approves clients so they don’t have to apply separately on the federal site.

Early hiccups

So far, CPA enrollment exceeds EBB by 30% in Colorado. This may be due to deployment complications when launching EBB. Consumers had to be approved by the Universal Service Administrative Company. But entering the information had to be exact, like typing “Street” instead of “St”. — otherwise, the application generated an error.

The registration process has since been simplified, said Sarah Fishering, of Clearnetworx, a fiber internet service provider in Montrose. “Literally, I saw a client do it in less than 15 minutes.”

These are some of the behind-the-scenes processes that haven’t worked out so smoothly. Ciello, which provides broadband service in the San Luis Valley, can’t get an answer as to why two ACP customers were suddenly delisted in April, so Ciello hasn’t been reimbursed. .

“They (customers) didn’t know why and we didn’t know why,” said Jennifer Alonzo, marketing and sales coordinator at Ciello. “We still gave them the credit even though we won’t be refunded. … It’s hard to get anyone’s support. We contacted something via email and I think it took five weeks to get a response.

A worker installs wired fiber for Clearnetworx, a Montrose-based broadband provider. (Provided by Clearnetworx)

Fishering said family-owned Clearnetworx had similar issues with EBB and was unsure how to get reimbursed after covering the cost for customers. However, getting into EBB early on helped attract customers who continued on ACP.

“We didn’t have to throw the baby out with the bathwater and we can just move forward with a process that we now know works,” she said. “It gives us the opportunity to really communicate a lot about the program and to benefit as many people as possible.”

For consumers who do not have or have limited internet access or have difficulty applying online, there may be in-person options. Comcast encourages potential customers to stop by a Comcast Xfinity store.

Clearnetworx said it has been helping customers in person since EBB launched.

“We have clients who may have more technology challenges or maybe they really have no way of being able to access this online application process,” Fishering said. “We have them sit down with a (customer service representative) in person – it’s a requirement of the program – and go through the question-and-answer process, kind of an interview style.”

Not a profit generator

Internet service in sparsely populated areas is slow, expensive, and offers few options. In the state’s least populated counties, there was only one household per county registered with the CPA as of May 9, according to federal data.

And in these counties, satellite internet may be the only option. Hughes Net, which participates in ACP, costs $64.99 per month for the company’s 15GB plan offering download speeds of 25 Mbps, according to the company. There are also additional costs for equipment.

It’s certainly not a new revenue stream for internet businesses, said Monroe Johnson, Ciello’s chief technology officer.

“We do it as community service and because of who we are,” Johnson said. “It actually increased costs for the supplier without any additional money.”

San Luis Valley Rural Electric Cooperative and Ciello install internet in the home of an RE-1 student in the Mountain Valley School District. The district has partnered with the co-op and Ciello to install internet for about 15 families so students can complete homework remotely. (Travis Garoutte, Special for The Colorado Sun)

Ciello’s cheapest plan is $42.95 for 25 Mbps up and down for fiber users. This means that ACP customers still pay around $13 per month, although some customers opt for faster and more expensive plans because they can benefit from the ACP advantage.

Local providers like Ciello are already working with community organizations to provide internet. The company has installed Wi-Fi hotspots at boys’ and girls’ clubs in Alamosa and other locations in the San Luis Valley.

Clearnetworx has what it calls a Student Connection Program which is open to school district staff and students. They can get a $5-$10 discount, which would be on top of the ACP benefit, and he has a different program that offers free internet to eligible students for a free or reduced lunch, which is considered a measure of poverty.

And Live Wire Networks is working with the Boulder Valley School District to provide internet service to any family that had a student on the free or reduced lunch program. He also invested early on to become a Lifeline provider, so he receives federal funds to serve low-income mobile and voice customers.

It still costs company staff time and effort to process ACP complaints and answer questions, but it matches what they are already doing in the community to build better broadband and attract new customers, a said Jim Hinsdale, president of Live Wire.

“We want to contribute to the community. And there is good economic sense in doing so,” Hinsdale said. “Especially working with schools, it was a free service. We’re trying to find a way to monetize this arrangement, because we have to put a lot of money into towers and conduits and build them. It helps balance that.

How to Apply for the Affordable Connectivity Program:

  • Provides $30 per month (or $75 for those living on tribal land) to offset internet costs
  • Eligibility is based on income at or below 200% of the federal poverty guidelines (see chart) or if a household member receives government assistance, including Medicaid, the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, or other programs.
  • Consumers can see if they qualify for the Affordable Connectivity Program by visiting GetInternet.gov.
  • Find a participating Internet Service Provider: affordableconnectivity.gov/companies-near-me
  • ISPs typically sign up new ACP customers and process claims monthly for reimbursement. Customers typically see the $30 discount on the invoice.

We believe vital information should be seen by those affected, whether it is a public health crisis, investigative reporting, or holding lawmakers accountable. This report depends on the support of readers like you.

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Red and Black Gala celebrates the best in tech athletics https://sanshinzencommunity.org/red-and-black-gala-celebrates-the-best-in-tech-athletics/ Mon, 09 May 2022 02:54:00 +0000 https://sanshinzencommunity.org/red-and-black-gala-celebrates-the-best-in-tech-athletics/ LUBBOCK, TX –Texas Tech Athletics celebrated its best and brightest of the 2021-22 college year Sunday night at the Red and Black Gala hosted by the JT Student-Athlete Development Department and Margaret Talkington at Buddy Holly Hall. The gala, an annual event for Texas Tech student-athletes each May, recognizes student-athletes not only for their work […]]]>

LUBBOCK, TX –Texas Tech Athletics celebrated its best and brightest of the 2021-22 college year Sunday night at the Red and Black Gala hosted by the JT Student-Athlete Development Department and Margaret Talkington at Buddy Holly Hall.

The gala, an annual event for Texas Tech student-athletes each May, recognizes student-athletes not only for their work in competition, but also in the classroom and through community service initiatives. The show also highlights various athletic staff and community groups for their efforts in promoting a successful student-athlete experience.

After earning his first appearance in an NCAA tournament in 20 years, Tony GraystoneThe volleyball program was a frequent recipient throughout the night after being named Women’s Team of the Year. Graystone, himself, was named Female Athletic Coach of the Year for his efforts to revitalize the volleyball program.

On the men’s side, the Red Raider men’s golf and basketball programs shared Team of the Year honors after Greg Sands‘ finished tied for 11th nationally at last year’s NCAA championships. The men’s basketball program, meanwhile, went from unranked to start the season to a Sweet 16 appearance last season, winning Mark Adams additional accolades as Male Athletic Coach of the Year.

Jace Jungthe reigning Big 12 Player of the Year on Diamond, and Ruth Usoro, two-time national triple jump champion, were each named Red Raiders of the Year for their competitive work. They were joined on stage earlier in the evening by female basketball players Bryn Gerlichwho received the prestigious Jeannine McHaney Award.

The ceremony also honored the top senior graduate for each sport, the list of student-athletes who achieved a perfect 4.0 GPA during the fall semester, and recipients of the Big 12’s Dr. Gerald Lage award. Conference. Additional winners included athletics Gabe Oladipo and softball Maddie Westmoreland with the Spirit and Sportsmanship Awards then football xavier white and soccer Penelope Mulenga as Returning Athletes of the Year.

Each award presented at the gala was determined based on academic merit in consultation with athletic staff including at the Marsha Sharp Center for Student-Athletes and the JT and Margaret Talkington Department of Student-Athlete Development.

Below is a full list of Red and Black Gala Award winners.

RED AND BLACK GALA AWARD WINNERS
Spirit and Sportsmanship Awards:
Gabe Oladipo (Athletics), Maddie Westmoreland (Balloon-soft)

Returning Athletes of the Year: xavier white (Soccer), Penelope Mulenga (Football)

JT and Margaret Talkington Student-Athlete Development Award: Tony Bradford Jr. (Soccer), callie jones (Racetrack)

Best GPA Team: Men’s golf and women’s golf

Red Raider Giveback Rewards: Women’s football and golf

Jeannine McHaney Award: Bryn Gerlich (women’s basketball)

Athletics Administrator of the Year: Imelda GarciaAthletic Coach (Volleyball)

Athletics Teammate Award: Donation night at Cardinals Sports Center

Workhorse of strength and conditioning: Lexy Hightower (women’s basketball), Bryson Williams (men’s basketball), Riley Ehlen (soft ball), Caitlin Dugan (Volleyball), Sandy Scott (men’s golf), Anna Dong (women’s golf), Isaac Arevalo (Tennis Men), Olivia Peet (Women’s Tennis), Konner wood (men’s athletics), callie jones (women’s athletics), Thomas Velvin (men’s cross country), Halena Rahman (Women’s Cross Country), Dadrion Taylor-Demerson (Soccer), Hannah Anderson (Football), Brandon Birdsell (Baseball)

Red & Black Price: Viviane Gray (women’s basketball), Bryson Williams (men’s basketball), payton jackson (Softball), Brooke Kansas (Volleyball), Sandy Scott (men’s golf), Gala Dumez (women’s golf), Ilgiz Valiev (Tennis Men), Marguerite Skriabina (Women’s Tennis), Mouad Zahafi (Men’s Track), Monae Nichols (Women’s Track), Edward Rush (men’s cross country), Halena Rahman (Women’s Cross Country), Henri Teter (Soccer), Hannah Anderson (Football), Parker-Kelly (Baseball)
Fearless Champion Rewards:
Parker-Kelly (Baseball), Viviane Gray (women’s basketball)

Red Raiders of the Year: Ruth Usoro (Athletics), Jace Jung (Baseball)

Coaches of the year: Mark Adams (men’s basketball), Tony Graystone (Volleyball)

Teams of the year: Men’s Golf/Men’s Basketball and Volleyball

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Maine Community College System Lists 2022 Students of the Year https://sanshinzencommunity.org/maine-community-college-system-lists-2022-students-of-the-year/ Sat, 07 May 2022 04:00:12 +0000 https://sanshinzencommunity.org/maine-community-college-system-lists-2022-students-of-the-year/ The Augusta-based Maine Community College System Board of Trustees recognized the achievements of seven students selected as students of the year 2022. The following students were selected for their academic achievement and their involvement on campus and in the community, according to a press release from Maine’s two-year comprehensive college system. Ryan Ashby, Northern Maine […]]]>

The Augusta-based Maine Community College System Board of Trustees recognized the achievements of seven students selected as students of the year 2022. The following students were selected for their academic achievement and their involvement on campus and in the community, according to a press release from Maine’s two-year comprehensive college system.

Ryan Ashby, Northern Maine Community College

Ashby, of Mapleton, is enrolled in NMCC’s business administration program. When a serious car accident nearly sidelined his studies, he said NMCC faculty and staff worked with him to ensure he could complete his classes while recovering, earning his online diploma.

Ashby volunteers at her local church and uses her wellness journey to motivate others. His commitment has paid off and he plans to graduate this spring.

He plans to transfer and get a bachelor’s degree, with the goal of eventually getting his master’s in business administration, and working in employee development or operations and management.

Suzanne Hanvey, Southern Maine Community College

Hanvey, of Saco, is enrolled in SMCC’s Liberal Studies program with a concentration in science. She is president of the Community Service Club and the Hiking and Foraging Club, and serves on the Student Senate and the SMCC Chapter of the Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society while maintaining a near-perfect GPA.

Hanvey is also a Certified Behavioral Health Professional and spends 20-40 hours a week working with children who have behavioral health issues. She plans to graduate from SMCC next spring and continue her studies with the goal of embarking on a career preserving the natural habitats of animals that live in endangered areas.

Graca Muzela Photo submitted

Graça Muzela, Washington County Community College

Muzela, of Auburn, is enrolled in WCCC’s residential and commercial electrical program. Muzela, originally from Angola, is an active volunteer, providing advice to public agencies on culturally and linguistically appropriate messaging around COVID-19 for immigrants, refugees and BIPOC communities, and delivering food and providing transportation. school-aged children.

At WCCC, he works as a resident assistant. He plans to earn his journeyman electrician’s license and possibly transfer to the University of Maine to earn a degree in electrical engineering.

Julia Christmas Photo submitted

Julia Noel, Central Maine Community College

Noel, from Sabattus, is enrolled in the CMCC’s Early Childhood Education program. She is a member of the college women’s soccer team and a volunteer with Andro United, a youth indoor soccer program in Lewiston.

When not playing soccer, Noel is a Resident Assistant and is committed to improving the residential experience for students at CMCC. She is an academic mentor for the young players on the soccer team and helps organize the team’s involvement in the community.

She plans to graduate in May and pursue a career teaching kindergarten children.

Rebecca Peters, Community College of Eastern Maine

Peters, of Lincoln, is enrolled in EMCC’s criminal justice program. She completed the Phase I and II programs at the Maine Criminal Justice Academy, while taking courses at EMCC. She earned her police officer certification in Maine two months before graduating from EMCC and was sworn in as a full-time police officer with the Lincoln Police Department in February.

She is completing field officer training and will eventually complete basic law enforcement training at the MCJA.

Tyler Sar, York County Community College

Sar, from Sanford, is enrolled in the YCCC Criminal Justice Program. A first-generation student, he was named top of his class at Maine Criminal Justice Corrections Academy.

With his degree in criminal justice from the YCCC and the successful completion of his academic training, Sar was hired as a correctional officer with the York County Sheriff’s Department. He said he wants to make a difference in people’s lives and hopes to work with offenders to reduce recidivism and the negative impact incarceration can have on a person’s life.

Kristin Wallacker Photo submitted

Kristin Wallaker, Kennebec Valley Community College

Wallaker, of New Portland, is enrolled in KVCC’s electrical technology program. She is a member of the Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society and last year was part of the All-Maine Academic Team and was honored as Maine’s New Century Scholar.

Wallaker said she’s learning the skills to pursue many opportunities in a high-demand, high-paying field, whether it’s opening her own business or joining a company. She is employed by RLC Engineering as a protection and control designer and plans to return to KVCC part-time to continue her studies in business.

Students were selected by their college faculty and staff for their academic achievement and their involvement on campus and in the community. In addition to being named Student of the Year, each student received a John and Jana Lapoint Leadership Award of $1,000.

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Iowa Council Hosts Conversation on Role of Immigrants and Refugees in Public Policy https://sanshinzencommunity.org/iowa-council-hosts-conversation-on-role-of-immigrants-and-refugees-in-public-policy/ Wed, 04 May 2022 23:04:00 +0000 https://sanshinzencommunity.org/iowa-council-hosts-conversation-on-role-of-immigrants-and-refugees-in-public-policy/ The City of Iowa Council on Foreign Relations hosted a panel on Wednesday to discuss how communities can work to include immigrants and refugees in policymaking. Community leaders from four different Iowa cities shared their experience with engaged residents. Columbus Junction, Storm Lake, Marshalltown, and West Liberty have all seen an influx of immigrants in […]]]>

The City of Iowa Council on Foreign Relations hosted a panel on Wednesday to discuss how communities can work to include immigrants and refugees in policymaking.

Community leaders from four different Iowa cities shared their experience with engaged residents. Columbus Junction, Storm Lake, Marshalltown, and West Liberty have all seen an influx of immigrants in recent decades. With growing populations of different cultures, cities have had to identify new resources to fill knowledge gaps for arrivals.

Cristina Ortiz, an associate professor at the University of Minnesota Morris who studies immigrant communities in the Midwest, said it’s important for cities to seek out resources beyond just translation for newcomers.

“As policymakers, we need to ask ourselves if we are contextualizing these processes and institutional requirements in a way that makes sense to people who don’t already have this contextual knowledge,” Ortiz said.

“We have to look at things not just from our point of view, but from a global point of view.”

Caleb Knuston, urban planner in Marshalltown

Marshalltown city planner Caleb Knutson said cities need to reconsider their public policies as their community composition changes. In his own work with his community, he said he tries to ensure that city standards always serve the whole community.

“We have to look at things not just from our perspective, but from a global perspective,” Knutson said. “Often, when there are design standards for a community, I always ask, ‘Who are these design standards for? When were they written? »

The City of West Liberty has incorporated more bilingual signage throughout the city to encourage immigrants and refugees. Council member Cara McFerrin has said too often that the task of translating between languages ​​falls on immigrant children.

“We were able to adopt it that way, so it’s not just the responsibility of one person or a young child to do the translation,” McFerrin said.

Many West Liberty residents recommend stopping by the Acapulco Mexican Bakery & Grocery. It has been in the city for years, although it has had various owners over that time.

Knutson said city leaders can’t expect immigrants and refugees to seek them out with all their needs. Instead, decision makers need to meet them where they are in the community.

But there are often obstacles to gaining trust within migrant communities. Storm Lake Times editor Art Cullen said fear of eviction is palpable in his northwest Iowa community. He said it was harder for community service workers to connect with Lao and Spanish-speaking communities.

“The eyes and ears of them have gone underground now because they are scared,” he said. “And it’s because of this cynical, flawed immigration system that no one is doing anything.”

tyson-storm-lake.jpg

Tyson’s Storm Lake plant has recruited many immigrants into its workforce over the years.

Panelists also cited lack of political representation as a barrier to serving immigrant and refugee communities. West Liberty in eastern Iowa has the only majority-minority city council in the state. Knutson said he wants to see more cities with large immigrant populations follow suit.

“Making sure we have people at all levels, and I’m not just saying it’s the city council,” he said. “It’s about making sure we’re represented on the planning board, the planning and zoning commission, the park boards. That’s how we get people involved. »

Ortiz said she wants to see more communities adopt bilingual programs and community ID cards — which help immigrants and refugees who may not have the necessary documentation to obtain government-issued ID. the state.

“I hope more communities will look at these examples and say, ‘What can we do to make this happen in our community as well?’ “, she said.

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Freed fraudster David Drumm is finally doing unpaid community service – after veering off corruption in the face of the pandemic https://sanshinzencommunity.org/freed-fraudster-david-drumm-is-finally-doing-unpaid-community-service-after-veering-off-corruption-in-the-face-of-the-pandemic/ Tue, 03 May 2022 06:07:03 +0000 https://sanshinzencommunity.org/freed-fraudster-david-drumm-is-finally-doing-unpaid-community-service-after-veering-off-corruption-in-the-face-of-the-pandemic/ FREED fraudster David Drumm is finally doing some unpaid community service work – after deviating from the transplant due to the pandemic. The former head of the Anglo Irish Bank – who was jailed for his role in a €7.2bn fraud – has approached the maximum possible time to reduce his time in prison after […]]]>

FREED fraudster David Drumm is finally doing some unpaid community service work – after deviating from the transplant due to the pandemic.

The former head of the Anglo Irish Bank – who was jailed for his role in a €7.2bn fraud – has approached the maximum possible time to reduce his time in prison after taking advantage of the scheme community return.

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Drumm will perform community service
Drum with his wife Lorraine

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Drum with his wife Lorraine

Disgraced Drumm was released in February last year after serving just two years and eight months of a six-year prison sentence.

The shamed banker’s sentence ended up with less than four-and-a-half months in prison here for every billion euros he was convicted of conspiring to defraud Anglo under his watch.

Despite his role in Ireland’s most spectacular corporate collapse, Drumm was granted early bail in return for unpaid community service.

After leaving prison, the 55-year-old avoided work as the unpaid work portion of the community return program was suspended under Covid-19 restrictions.

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But The Irish Sun can today reveal that Drumm, from Skerries, north Dublin, is now doing work.

The most common types of work undertaken by return-to-community program participants are landscaping/gardening, painting/decorating, and renovation.

A Department of Justice spokesperson told The Irish Sun: “The Department cannot comment on any individual case. The Community Return Program is an initiative through which carefully selected prisoners, serving sentences between one and eight years, can benefit from a reviewable temporary release associated with the obligation to carry out community service. such as painting, gardening or removing graffiti in a supervised group setting under the supervision of the probation service.

The Irish Sun includes Drumm and more than 60 other people have recently taken part in the community return programme. Drumm spent just seven months in Dublin’s Mountjoy Prison before being moved to Loughan House, an open prison in Blacklion, Co Cavan.

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He then left Loughan House after getting 50% off his sentence.

Under the Community Return Program, inmates who meet certain criteria are granted early temporary release in exchange for unpaid community service.

But Drumm circumvented that obligation due to the pandemic and only had to answer the phone on his designated work days, confirming his availability and continued commitment to participate in the program.

Drumm was sentenced to six years in prison in June 2018 for criminal association and false accounts.

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The scammer was found guilty of allowing a €7.2 billion fraud conspiracy and false accounting at Anglo between March and September 2008.

The taxpayer had to pay more than 30 billion euros to bail out the notorious lender.

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Woodland High School’s Blaine Wilson Receives A. Dale Lacky Scholarship – Daily Democrat https://sanshinzencommunity.org/woodland-high-schools-blaine-wilson-receives-a-dale-lacky-scholarship-daily-democrat/ Sun, 01 May 2022 15:20:42 +0000 https://sanshinzencommunity.org/woodland-high-schools-blaine-wilson-receives-a-dale-lacky-scholarship-daily-democrat/ The 2021-22 school year has been a return to normal for many students. One Woodland Joint Unified School District student who was able to take full advantage of a full in-person school schedule to accompany three uninterrupted high school sports seasons was Blaine Wilson of Woodland High. This season, Wilson’s athletic and academic achievements were […]]]>

The 2021-22 school year has been a return to normal for many students. One Woodland Joint Unified School District student who was able to take full advantage of a full in-person school schedule to accompany three uninterrupted high school sports seasons was Blaine Wilson of Woodland High.

This season, Wilson’s athletic and academic achievements were noticed by athletic director Alberto Tamayo and earned him an A. Dale Lacky Scholar-Athlete Award. Wilson received his award earlier this week at a breakfast awards ceremony, which took place at Hutchins Street Square in Lodi.

“It meant a lot to me to know that I was recognized and people saw me as a leader,” Wilson said. “They also saw my success in class. That includes community service, athletics, and academics, so it was cool to know that people recognized that about me, too.

The award, named after former CIF Chapter and State President A. Dale Lacky, recognizes the top male and female student-athletes in the Chapter. Each league can send two winners, a male and a female, to be honored.

The scholarship committee selects four male and four female students as recipients of a $1,000 scholarship. The other candidates receive a $500 bursary from the Section. Wilson was the recipient of the $500 prize.

Wilson joins recent A. Dale Lacky Award winners from Woodland, including Lauren Bryson of Pioneer High School in 2021 and Tatum Wentworth and Dylan Fullerton in 2020, who attended Pioneer and Woodland High School, respectively.

Athletically, Wilson lined up as Wolves started from left tackle in the fall and helped them to a playoff game at home and a trip to the second round of the playoffs, neither of which had been made. over the previous 25 years. In the winter, he played a vital role for the Wolves basketball team as a power forward and center, and currently, he is the number five or sixth ranked player on the Wolves golf team.

“I would say this year has been quite successful,” Wilson said of his athletic accomplishments. “I was really happy that we got the chance to play. We were lucky because the kids last year didn’t have a full year.

Off the field, Wilson helps with community service in elementary schools and plays an important role in the Woodland High Future Farmers of America as a senior officer.

“I’ve always been a farm kid, and that’s what FFA is based on,” Wilson said. “Being with other people who have the same interests as me is great. It’s a closer group of people. They also have their own special classes. You make a lot of close friends in there.

In class, Wilson has an impressive average of 4.06. He is in two AP classes in English and government and one FFA farm for class, statistics and veterinary sciences.

“AP classes are a lot harder, obviously, but my teachers prepared me really well, so they’re going pretty well,” Wilson said.

He plans to continue his academic career at California Polytechnic State University in San Luis Obispo and study agricultural systems management.

“I just hope to make more memories with my close friends before we go our separate ways,” Wilson said. “It will be a bit sad, but I try to continue to enjoy it all and not stress too much.”

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National Charity League Palm Springs rewards senior graduates https://sanshinzencommunity.org/national-charity-league-palm-springs-rewards-senior-graduates/ Fri, 29 Apr 2022 07:37:15 +0000 https://sanshinzencommunity.org/national-charity-league-palm-springs-rewards-senior-graduates/ the National Benevolent League Inc. Palm Springs (NCL)a local non-profit organization made up of volunteer mothers and daughters, honored five senior graduates at its annual convention Senior Recognition and Fashion Show April 9 at the DoubleTree Resort. The Class of 2022 has accumulated more than 5,000 volunteer hours with local nonprofits while serving with NCL […]]]>

the National Benevolent League Inc. Palm Springs (NCL)a local non-profit organization made up of volunteer mothers and daughters, honored five senior graduates at its annual convention Senior Recognition and Fashion Show April 9 at the DoubleTree Resort. The Class of 2022 has accumulated more than 5,000 volunteer hours with local nonprofits while serving with NCL for four to six years.

The Elder Recognition is the culminating event for teenage members who volunteered with their mothers in the community while at NCL. The event included a dinner, awards show and a sustainable fashion show using recycled clothing provided by the Habitat for Humanity ReStore. During the event, the elderly Aidan Carrera, Angelina Delgado, Brianna Kidd, Makayla Smith and Gracie Van Dijk were introduced by family members as they were recognized for their community service and philanthropic efforts through their NCL membership.

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Fulbright grantee to dig earth in soil pollution documentary https://sanshinzencommunity.org/fulbright-grantee-to-dig-earth-in-soil-pollution-documentary/ Wed, 27 Apr 2022 16:04:18 +0000 https://sanshinzencommunity.org/fulbright-grantee-to-dig-earth-in-soil-pollution-documentary/ During the reign of the former Soviet Union, Moldova was the agricultural center of the federation. The country produced crops under policies that pushed production at all costs, but even three decades after the collapse of the Soviet Union, Moldova’s fertile soils are still paying the price of overexploitation, says Avital Brodski, who will travel […]]]>

During the reign of the former Soviet Union, Moldova was the agricultural center of the federation. The country produced crops under policies that pushed production at all costs, but even three decades after the collapse of the Soviet Union, Moldova’s fertile soils are still paying the price of overexploitation, says Avital Brodski, who will travel to the country in September to shoot a documentary on soil pollution as part of the American Fulbright Student Program.

“About 70% of the country was used for agriculture during the Soviet Union, but today only about 30% of the land is arable,” says Brodski, who will graduate from the Northeast in May with a degree in environmental studies and in media and film studies. .

Brodski, who grew up speaking Russian at home with his parents, will spend nine months traveling across the country filming and interviewing government officials and civilians about the consequences of unsustainable Soviet agricultural policies. The scholarship she received from the Fulbright program will cover living and travel expenses to and from Moldova.

“After the dissolution of the Soviet Union, Moldova received very little help from anyone else. They received no support from the EU or NATO “But their GDP growth is better than the United States in terms of steadily improving over the years, so I want to investigate what’s causing that growth even though less and less land can be cultivated.”

Wine production is an important part of Moldova’s economy, Brodski says, and she hopes to capture in her film the intersection of agriculture, economy and national identity when it comes to wine.

Brodski says she is interested in the long-term effects that government policies have on the environment in Moldova and beyond. “The decisions we make today will have repercussions in the future,” she says. “I want to examine how the policies implemented by large powerful countries shape the environment.”

Brodski has experience directing documentaries as part of his undergraduate studies at Northeastern. She is currently working on her capstone project, which is a documentary about dinosaur footprints in New England and elsewhere in the United States.

Her interest in paleontology was sparked during the Age of Dinosaurs course she took with marine and environmental science professor, Richard Bailey. Brodski has interviewed archaeologists and filmed at dinosaur track sites in Massachusetts, Connecticut, Colorado and Utah for the upcoming documentary, which she hopes to submit to film festivals when completed.

Brodski also made another documentary at Northeastern with the help of Michael Carr, senior lecturer at the College of Arts, Media and Design. At a Dialogue of Civilizations in the UK, Brodski and eight other classmates made a documentary about young activists leading the charge in Britain’s environmental movement.

Brodski believes she was selected for this award because of the relevance of the subject matter of her proposal and her extensive experience in documentary filmmaking. “Nowadays we think of human innovation as synonymous with progress, but sometimes we forget that all of those decisions have a lasting impact on the earth,” she says.

For media inquiries, please contact media@northeastern.edu.

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