Community helps El Dorado woman clean up storm


In the days following Storm Sierra on December 26, the hardest-hit towns came together to help their neighbors in need. Snow buried Joyce Gothard’s steep driveway in the El Dorado County community in Camino to the point that no one could easily come in to help her, and she couldn’t get out. “I’ve never seen anything like it!” Gothard said when describing the snow that had accumulated around his house. “We were two and a half feet two winters ago, but I have fences practically buried now. “I went, ‘It’s right next door! I could throw a snowball at their house, ”said Marc Galliani, who lives not far from the house in Gothard. He spent two hours Thursday morning on his tractor clearing snow from his driveway. “I just drove the tractor on the road. . I cleaned their driveway, ”he said. “I hope they can get in and out now.” For Galliani, participating is a way of paying forward. “I am disabled and I often need help and all my neighbors help me whenever I need it,” he said. “Whenever I can reciprocate, I go to.” Jesse Baldwin didn’t know any of the other guys who showed up to the Gotthard house to help, but that didn’t matter. “A guy brought a propane tank and a heater. He brought his little multimeter; he’s doing H-VAC,” Baldwin explained. “We just put our heads together and squared them.” Baldwin, like Galliani, also had reason to want to help. “Funny,” he said. “I was fired this morning.” So when he saw a post on social media about the members of with the community in need of help, he joined the others at Gothard’s as they cleared his driveway of snow and tree branches and provided him with generators and a working wood stove. said, “Well, I better let go. Come here,” Baldwin said. “It’s selfish of me to sit in my warm house when I’m able-bodied and I can help them and they have need help… that’s obvious. ”Gothard said she had never met the people who came to see her at the house before, but now they worked. they worked together on projects that needed to be done. “They are angels!” Gothard explained. “I thought, I wish they could airlift helpers here. Well, I felt like they had done that. I just dropped them from the sky! If this week’s storm did anything, it reminded small communities like Camino that when they come together they can accomplish a lot for their neighbors. “It’s downright American,” neighbor Alan Kinman said. “It’s really nice to see. People come out and regroup and just come in and take care of the business. ”

In the days following Storm Sierra on December 26, the hardest-hit towns came together to help their neighbors in need.

Snow buried Joyce Gothard’s steep driveway in the El Dorado County community in Camino to the point that no one could easily come in to help, and she couldn’t get out.

“I’ve never seen anything like it! Gothard said, describing the snow that had collected around his house. “We were two and a half feet two winters ago, but I have fences practically buried now. “

When the community’s social media pages learned that Gothard needed a helping hand cleaning his driveway, help arrived.

“I went, ‘It’s right next door! I could throw a snowball at their house, ”said Marc Galliani, who lives not far from the house in Gothard.

He spent two hours Thursday morning on his tractor clearing snow from his driveway.

“I just drove the tractor on the road. I cleaned their driveway, ”he said. “I hope they can get in and out now.”

For Galliani, participating is a way to pay for the next.

“I am disabled and I often need help and all my neighbors help me whenever I need it,” he said. “Anytime I can reciprocate, I will. “

Jesse Baldwin didn’t know any of the other guys who showed up at Gothard to help him, but that didn’t matter.

“A guy brought a propane tank and a heater. He brought his little multimeter; it does H-VAC, ”Baldwin explained. “We just put our heads together and squared them.”

Baldwin, like Galliani, also had reasons for wanting to help.

“It’s funny,” he said. “I was fired this morning.

So when he saw a social media post about community members needing help, he joined the others at Gothard as they cleared his driveway of snow and tree branches and handed its generators and wood stove in working order.

“I said, ‘Well, I better let go. Come here, ”Baldwin said. “It’s selfish of me to sit in my warm house when I’m able-bodied and I can help them and they need help… it’s obvious.”

Gothard said she had never met the people who have been to her house before, but were working there on projects that needed to be completed.

“They are angels! Gothard explained. “I thought, I wish they could airlift helpers here. Well, I felt like they had done that. I just dropped them from the sky! “

If this week’s storm did anything, it reminded small communities like Camino that when they come together they can accomplish a lot for their neighbors.

“It’s downright American,” said neighbor Alan Kinman. “It’s really nice to see. People come out and regroup and just come in and take care of the business. “


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